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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just having a conversation. let me begin by saying that all of you in this room are not just business leaders, not just ceo's of your companies, but you're also economic leaders and thought leaders in this c
attack on the u.s. con suit late in benghazi. the "new york times" are reporting libyan authorities are refusing to cooperate into the investigation into the assault that killed four americans including our ambassador there, chris stevens on september 11th. "the times" reporting local police and government officials are reluctant to arrest islamist extremists who are suspected to belong to powerful militias there. despite the fact that the fbi identified several suspects none has been arrested in the country and even some have fled benghazi. jenna: a big day for michigan, one of the most pro-labor states historically in this nation about to become a right-to-work state. the uns are not going down without a fight. they are staging massive protests. i'm jenna lee. rick: i'm rick folbaum in for jon scott. as massive amounts of demonstrators state troopers with tear gas and batons stand at the ready. governor rick snyder vowing to sign the right to work legislation as soon at it hits his desk. the measure means employees will decide for themselves whether they want to join and financial
in benghazi. catherine herridge is life in washington with the latest. >> reporter: al-qaeda has strengthened their bases in libya and the in the broader region of north africa to the extent that the administration is investigating whether it has the authority to target the drone strategy in the tribal areas of pakistan as well as yemen. after the terrorist attack in benghazi on the consulate, analysts say al-qaeda has sought to capitalize to use its so-called victory to raise money and also recruit. there is evidence that the growth of the al-qaeda affiliate in libya is part of a broader campaign by senior leadership in pakistan to establish a global presence through its affiliates and that the decision to send al-qaeda operatives to libya was made and executed as long ago as 2011. now analysts describe an emerging arc of instability. earlier the week the head of defense operations in africa summed up al-qaeda's reach. >> whether it's adjusting al-shabaab and al-qaeda affiliate in east africa, principal my somalia, a growing extremist network in libya across the region into northern mali and
to deny additional security to our ambassador, who is heading to benghazi an even to allow him to be there but there have been multiple attacks in benghazi. the red cross pulled out. the british pulled out. we continue to send our underprotected ambassador there where he and three other brave americans were massacred. jon: is it your view that we should not have had diplomatic personnel on the ground or we should have had a military style protection force or both? >> they either needed to be not there or adequately protected. i want to know why the administration on two occasions following two already previous attacks on the consulate there in benghazi still denied additional security and allowed our ambassador there. these are things that developed before the attacks. so much of this focus has been what happened during and after the attack with susan rice and her comments. i want to get it back to the president and the secretary of state and they bear responsibility for what happened on 9/11. jon: well, secretary clinton has already said that the buck stops with her as far as
when it came under fire in benghazi, including our ambassador to libya, chris stevens. secretary of state hillary clinton created the independent review board, however, she will not be able to testify at the benghazi hearings later this week because of a concussion. let's talk about it all with steven yates a former deputy assistant for the vice president for national security affairs during the bush administration. steven, thank you for being with us today. >> glad to be with you, jon. jon: this independent advisory review board was appointed by the state department. does that mean it's controlled by the state department or does it live up to it's title of independence in. >> it's independent in the sense that it doesn't come within the bureaucracy. it will be former officials that guide the effort. it will be informed very much by sources within the bureaucracy itself. i think it's part of an effort to focus more on lower-level bureaucrat particular decisions and operational decisions and away from political and policy decision has fed into the controversy. jon: do you expect w
to close down the cia annex in benghazi? >> reporter: it's worth contrasting the status of the consulate with that. while the consulate site has never been secured, fox news is told that the cia annex in benghazi was shuttered by september 12th less than 24 hours after the attack. all classified information was removed or pwurpbld. burned. the decision to close down the annex same at 5:15 local time when the annex took fire from two mortars. the process began the night before after the consulate was attacked in the evening hours. the initial stages of the agency's proscribed evacuation kicked in as a cautionary step. once it was clear they could not sustain their position that was wrapped up and they were able to get everything out, classified information, either moved or destroyed by about 7:00am local time. so the contrast is that within hours the cia was able to close down their operation, and that consulate has never been secured by any u.s. personnel, jon. jon: and it's almost three months later and still all of these questions. >> reporter: that's correct, uh-huh. jon: thank you, c
in benghazi. it was involved in attacks and planned attacks in europe. a lot of people forget they tried, actually in the 1990s to fly a plane in the eiffel tower much like what happened in new york on 9/11. so it's a very, virulent group that certainly threatens us and our allies. jenna: your expertise on this, peter, what do you think about our military intervention? we'll explain what that means in a moment. what do you think about us getting involved here? is this a good decision now with the tiling? what your thoughts? >> we need to recognize the threat and we need to prepare to do something but we need to really prepare the terrain. i'm very concerned that we're rushing into something that's very half-baked. the african force that is talked about is a little over 3300 men. which is a laughable amount when you're talking about an area the size of texas. it is not a serious force. so they need our help. they need some training but they're not adequate. so until there's really commitment to put a force in there, that can actually do something, we run the risk of jumping into something
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)